[Résolu] Adapter le thème Freshy au plugin Sidebar Widget ? (Créer un compte)

  • Statut : non résolu
7 sujets de 1 à 7 (sur un total de 7)
  • Auteur
    Messages
  • #449279
    Catioucha
    Participant
    Padawan WordPress
    56 contributions

    Bonjour,

    Ma configuration WP actuelle
    – Version de WordPress : 2.0.5
    – Thème utilisé : Freshy
    – Plugins en place : Hierarchical catégory + My catégory order
    – Nom de l’hebergeur : Free

    Problème(s) rencontré(s) :

    Je voudrais installer le module Sidebar Widget sur mon blog (adresse : http://catioucha.free.fr/terrier/ ) mais j’utilise le thème Freshy, or les modifs du plugins portent sur les thèmes “classic” et “default” si j’ai bien comprit, et selon le readme il faudra que je sois capable de “fixer” mon thème pour qu’il accèpte facilement ce plug…

    Le soucis c’est que normalement Freshy devrait être “widget friendly”, donc je comprends pas pourqoi ça me fait des erreurs… et comme je suis un néophyte ben j’arrive pas à adapter le code toute seule. Visiblement ça tient à pas grand chose : insérer une petite ligne de code où ça va bien… mais je trouve pas où la coller, cette ligne :(

    Mon SIDEBAR.PHP pour le thème freshy :

    <?php global $freshy_options; ?>
    	
    	<div id="sidebar">
    
    		<div>
    		<?php if ( !function_exists('dynamic_sidebar')
            || !dynamic_sidebar() ) : ?>
    		<?php if(function_exists('yy_menu')) : ?>
    
    			<h2><?php _e('Navigation',TEMPLATE_DOMAIN); ?></h2>
    
    			<ul>
    			<?php yy_menu('sort_column=menu_order&title_li=',
    								'hide_empty=0&sort_column=name&optioncount=1&title_li=&hierarchical=1&feed=RSS&feed_image='.get_bloginfo('stylesheet_directory').'/images/icons/feed-icon-10x10.gif'); ?>
    			</ul>
    
    		<?php elseif (function_exists('freshy_menu')) : 
    			freshy_menu($freshy_options['args_pages'],$freshy_options['args_cats']);
    		endif; ?>
    
    			<h2><?php _e('Search',TEMPLATE_DOMAIN); ?></h2>
    			<?php include (TEMPLATEPATH . '/searchform.php'); ?>
    
    			<h2><?php _e('Links',TEMPLATE_DOMAIN); ?></h2>
    			<ul>
    			 <?php
    			 $link_cats = $wpdb->get_results(“SELECT cat_id, cat_name FROM $wpdb->linkcategories”);
    			 foreach ($link_cats as $link_cat) {
    			 ?>
    			  <li id="linkcat-<?php echo $link_cat->cat_id; ?>”><?php echo $link_cat->cat_name; ?>
    			   <ul>
    			    <?php wp_get_links($link_cat->cat_id); ?>
    			   </ul>
    			  </li>
    			 <?php } ?>
    			</ul>
    		<?php endif; ?>
    		</div>
    	</div>

    Et au cas où ça vous serve, Le readme du plugin :

    SIDEBAR WIDGETS PLUGIN
    AUTOMATTIC, INC.
    MARCH 2006
    
    
    WHAT IS THIS ALL ABOUT?
    
    It’s called Sidebar Widgets because it allows you to move things (widgets)
    around, in and out of your sidebar. A widget is something that you might want
    on your sidebar, such as a category list or the most recent comments or a link
    to your admin pages. There is even a widget that lets you type whatever you
    want in the sidebar, such as some HTML or Javascript code.
    
    
    HOW DO I INSTALL IT?
    
    First you have to put the files where they belong. We recommend putting all of
    the php script files in wp-content/plugins/widgets and keeping any new widget
    plugins there unless another location is specified.
    
    Here it is in graphic form:
    – wp-content
    	– plugins
    		– widgets
    			| delicious.php
    			| gsearch.php
    			| rss.png
    			| widgets.php
    			– scriptaculous
    				| builder.js
    				| controls.js
    				| dragdrop.js
    				| effects.js
    				| MIT-LICENSE
    				| prototype.js
    				| scriptaculous.js
    				| slider.js
    				 unittest.js
    	– themes
    		– classic
    			| functions.php (optional)
    			 sidebar.php (optional)
    		– default
    			| functions.php (optional)
    			 sidebar.php (optional)
    
    It will also work if you place the scriptaculous directory in wp-includes/js.
    It will also work if you store the RSS icon in wp-includes/images. It’s pretty
    flexible.
    
    Installing the plugin files isn’t enough, however. You must have a theme that
    supports sidebar widgets. To help you with that, we’ve included updated files
    for the WordPress 2.0 Default Theme (Kubrick) and the Classic theme. There are
    many themes that rely on Classic’s script files, so it’s probably a good idea to
    install the new Classic files unless you have modified the theme yourself.
    
    Don’t forget to activate the Widgets plugin.
    
    
    I HAVE INSTALLED AND ACTIVATED THE PLUGIN. NOW HOW DO I USE IT?
    
    Assuming you chose the Kubrick theme, you should now see a “Sidebar Widgets”
    item in the Presentation menu. This gives you a screen with two columns: a
    palette and a sidebar. The palette has all of the available widgets and the
    other column represents your sidebar. You can drag the widgets between the
    columns to create the exact combination that pleases you and your visitors.
    
    If you find that the widgets are not draggable, there are two likely causes:
    you installed the scriptaculous files in the wrong place, or your web browser
    is not running the scripts. 
    
    Some of the widgets will have a little icon on the right side of the draggable
    widget device. Click that icon to reveal that widget’s options. Click the X or
    the area outside the options box to return to the widget page. Your options are
    not saved until you click “Save changes” on the widget page.
    
    Two of the included widgets, Text and RSS, can be replicated several times.
    Below the palette you will find forms to change the number of Text and RSS
    widgets available. Reducing the number will only cause the extra widgets to be
    removed from the visual interface; the contents of the widgets is preserved.
    
    
    WHAT IF I DON’T LIKE KUBRICK?
    
    You should. He was a visionary film producer. You are entitled to your opinion,
    however, so we’ll give you a little tutorial on fixing up other themes.
    
    
    HOW DO I FIX UP MY THEME?
    
    First you have to ask yourself, “Do I know anything about my theme? Does it use
    an unordered list to create the sidebar?” (If you can’t answer that, you’ll
    need in-depth help on this task and that means either paying somebody a lot of
    money. Better yet, you can learn HTML. Sorry, we don’t teach that here.)
    
    Here is an example of good sidebar markup:
    <ul id="sidebar">
     <li id="about">
      <h2>About</h2>
      <p>This is my blog.</p>
     </li>
     <li id="links">
      <h2>Links</h2>
      <ul>
       <li><a href="http://example.com">Example</a></li>
      </ul>
     </li>
    </ul>
    
    Notice that the entire sidebar is an unordered list and the titles are in <h2>
    tags. Not every theme is built this way and it’s not necessary to do so, but
    it’s the simplest, most common, most semantically correct and the most widget-
    friendly sidebar markup there is. The element with id=”links” is the equivalent
    of one basic widget.
    
    When activated, the Dynamic Sidebar plugin gives you a few functions to use in
    your template just like template tags. These functions let WordPress replace
    your theme’s sidebar with a dynamic one while still falling back on the old
    sidebar in case you deactivate the plugin or remove all the widgets.
    
    Here is an example of a basic sidebar upgrade using the same markup as above:
    <ul id="sidebar">
    <?php if ( function_exists('dynamic_sidebar') && dynamic_sidebar() ) : else : ?>
     <li id="about">
      <h2>About</h2>
      <p>This is my blog.</p>
     </li>
     <li id="links">
      <h2>Links</h2>
      <ul>
       <li><a href="http://example.com">Example</a></li>
      </ul>
     </li>
    <?php endif; ?>
    </ul>
    
    See? We just added two lines to the template and now it’ll display a dynamic
    sidebar if possible, otherwise display the old sidebar. Disabling the plugin
    or removing all the widgets from the sidebar in the admin interface will cause
    the old sidebar to be displayed.
    
    Now there is one more thing to be done to the theme. Assuming you are using
    WordPress 2.0 or higher, this change will be made within functions.php in your
    theme’s directory. (WordPress 1.5 users: we don’t encourage people to use
    WordPress 1.5 anymore, so you won’t find any help here. We don’t even know if
    it’s possible because it hasn’t been tested.)
    
    Here is an example of functions.php for a theme that does not yet have such a
    file (no blank lines at the beginning or end of the file, please):
    <?php
    if ( function_exists('register_sidebar') )
    	register_sidebar();
    ?>
    
    That’s it, just four lines. This code tells the plugin that your theme will need
    exactly one dynamic sidebar. At this point, your admin interface should have an
    extra item in the Presentation menu: Sidebar Widgets. Try dragging some widgets
    from the palette on the left into the box marked Sidebar 1 and saving your
    changes. Got it working? Fantastic.
    
    
    MY SIDEBAR ISN’T A LIST. WHAT DO I DO?
    
    We knew you’d ask that. You’ll have to discover your sidebar’s design pattern,
    then use some extra parameters to tell the plugin how to format them to work
    with your theme. We’ll work through one example.
    
    Here’s the original markup:
    <div id="sidebar">
     <div class="title">About</div>
     <p>This is my blog.</p>
     <div class="title">Links</div>
     <ul>
      <li><a href="http://example.com">Example</a></li>
     </ul>
    </div>
    
    Yes, we’ve seen markup like this. It’s the second most common sidebar design
    pattern, which is why we chose it for the example. The first difference is that
    the sidebar is not built inside a <ul> tag. That means we should not be wrapping
    any of our widgets in <li> tags. The second difference is that our titles are
    wrapped in <div class="title"> instead of <h2> tags.
    
    We fix both of these issues by adding some parameters to the code in
    functions.php:
    <?php
    if ( function_exists('register_sidebar') )
    	register_sidebar(array(
    		'before_widget' => ”, // Removes <li>
    		‘after_widget’ => ”, // Removes </li>
    		‘before_title’ => ‘<div class="title">‘, // Replaces <h2>
    		‘after_title’ => ‘</div>‘, // Replaces </h2>
    	));
    ?>
    
    And here is the sidebar.php markup with our special template tags inserted:
    <div id="sidebar">
    <?php if ( function_exists('dynamic_sidebar') && dynamic_sidebar() ) : else : ?>
     <div class="title">About</div>
     <p>This is my blog.</p>
     <div class="title">Links</div>
     <ul>
      <li><a href="http://example.com">Example</a></li>
     </ul>
    <?php endif; ?>
    </div>
    
    That’s it. Your HTML markup is taken care of.
    
    Well, mostly taken care of. The default before_widget is a little bit more than
    just <li>. It includes an id and class. Well, sort of, but this is where it gets
    complicated. The default before_widget includes sprintf directives %1$s and
    %2$s, which are replaced by the id and class, respectively. The id is generated
    by sanitizing the widget name (which is why you should name your widget
    carefully: you don’t want duplicate id’s in one HTML document!) and the class is
    generated from the widget’s callback. This ensures all Text and RSS widgets, for
    instance, have unique id’s and similar classnames. Additionally, there is a 
    widget” class for each widget.
    
    So, if you want your theme to be most flexible you should use this instead of
    the empty strings shown above:
    		‘before_widget’ => ‘<div id="%1$s" class="widget %2$s">‘,
    		‘after_widget’ => ‘</div>‘;
    
    Now your HTML markup is REALLY taken care of.
    
    
    THE SEARCH WIDGET IS UGLY. I WANT MY THEME’S ORIGINAL SEARCH BOX AS A WIDGET.
    
    The widgets are CSS-selectable so that you can style them very specifically.
    However, the markup might not be to your liking. Many themes will look better
    if they supply their own widgets to replace some of the basic widgets, such as
    Search and Meta. It’s usually best to copy the existing markup from sidebar.php
    into a new widget in functions.php, then use the registration functions to
    replace the standard widget with the custom one.
    
    You can do this with any part of the theme’s sidebar, or all of them. Here’s an
    example of how to do this:
    function widget_mytheme_search() {
    ?>
    	<< PASTE YOUR SEARCH FORM HERE >>
    <?php
    }
    if ( function_exists('register_sidebar_widget') )
    	register_sidebar_widget(__('Search'), 'widget_mytheme_search');
    
    
    GREAT, I HAVE THE HTML MARKUP LOOKING GOOD BUT IT LOOKS AWEFUL IN THE BROWSER!
    
    Yeah, we knew that would happen. Your theme was probably written before widgets
    were born so the author didn't know she should make the stylesheet flexible
    enough to handle new markup in the sidebar. If you know some CSS, you should be
    able to handle the problems with a few new rules at the end of your stylesheet.
    Look in your blog's markup for the selectors (id and/or class) belonging to each
    widget you want to style.
    
    If CSS is a mystery to you, we regret that we can't offer you any help. As much
    as we'd like to help you with this, it just isn't possible due to the wild
    variations of themes. Contact your theme's author and ask her to update the
    theme for better compatibility with widgets.
    
    
    I'M A THEME AUTHOR. WHAT'S WITH ALL THIS EMAIL ASKING ME TO UPDATE MY THEME?
    
    You should be happy they like your theme well enough to contact you rather than
    switch to somebody else's themes. Well done on making users happy! We're making
    this plugin available now to see how the WordPress community likes it and to
    give people a chance to write widgets. If all goes well, this feature will be
    integrated into the standard WordPress distribution and any themes that don't
    support widgets will, if you believe our crystal ball, become very unpopular
    very fast.
    
    We're sorry if that seems threatening. It hurt us more than it hurt you.
    
    
    THIS WIDGET THING SEEMS MIGHTY POWERFUL. WHAT ELSE CAN I DO WITH IT?
    
    You have no idea how glad we are that you asked that. Here are a few ideas:
    
    * Write a theme that includes a special widget to set it apart from the others.
    
    * How about this for a special widget: a WordPress loop to show asides.
    
    * Register a replacement widget that buffers the original widget and transforms
    it somehow.
    
    * Remember that a "sidebar" is really just a name for a list. It can be
    displayed vertically or horizontally.
    
    * Remember that a "widget" is really just a name for a configurable code
    snippet. It can be invisible or it can be absolutely positioned.
    
    * Use the id and class attributes of any or all widgets in scripts to animate
    your sidebar.
    
    * Heck, use script.aculo.us or dbx (included with WordPress) to make your
    widgets draggable or even collapsible. Ain't scripting sweet?
    
    * Remember that the widget control API is just for convenience. You can always
    set up your own admin page instead. 
    
    * Support your users and get feedback so you can improve your widget. Put a link
    to your email or your site at the bottom of your widget control.
    
    * Send a link to your widgets to widgets@wordpress.com for review. We might put
    them up for everyone to use. You could be internet famous.
    
    
    I HAVE A THEME WITH MORE THAN ONE SIDEBAR. HOW DO I MAKE THEM ALL DYNAMIC?
    
    Oh, that's easy. Instead of register_sidebar() you should use
    register_sidebars(n) where n is the number of sidebars. Then place the
    appropriate number in the dynamic_sidebar() function, starting with 1. There are
    several ways to dse these functions but they aren't all documented here. You can
    even give your sidebars names rather than numbers, which lets you maintain a
    different set of saved sidebars for each theme. But if you need to know so much
    about the plugin, why aren't you reading the source code?
    
    
    THANKS FOR THIS PLUGIN! BLOGGING IS EVEN MORE FUN NOW! HOW CAN I REPAY YOU?
    
    Aww, you're welcome. Just keep on blogging and encourage others to blog, too.
    Also, encourage people to develop new widgets. Maybe they'll accept donations
    for their work.
    
    
    HOW DO I DEVELOP NEW WIDGETS?
    
    We included the Google Search and del.icio.us plugins as samples to show you
    what a widget plugin might look like. The Google Search widget is commented
    within inches of its life. Additionally, there are a few guidelines to follow.
    
    * Don't execute any code while the plugin is loaded. Use the plugins_loaded hook
    or you risk fatal errors due to undefined functions, or missing the boat
    completely because your plugin loaded before the one it depends on.
    
    * Use register_sidebar_widget($name, $callback) to add your widget to the admin
    interface.
    
    * Follow this template:
    function widget_myuniquewidget($args) {
    	extract($args);
    ?>
    		<?php echo $before_widget; ?>
    			<?php echo $before_title . 'My Unique Widget' . $after_title; ?>
    			Hello, World!
    		<?php echo $after_widget; ?>
    <?php
    }
    register_sidebar_widget('My Unique Widget', 'widget_myuniquewidget');
    
    * Don't leave out $before_widget, $after_widget, $before_title, or $after_title
    by accident. They are required for compatibility with various themes.
    
    * Name your widget and its functions carefully. Those strings will be used as
    HTML attributes and you don't want to cause identical id's in a single HTML
    document.
    
    * Localization is done internally to preserve the HTML id attribute. If you want
    your widget name localized with a textdomain, pass array($name, $textdomain)
    instead of $name.
    
    * To accommodate multi-widgets (e.g. Text and RSS) you can also pass a
    replacement value with the name: array($name_as_sprintf_pattern, $textdomain,
    $replacement). See the source.
    
    * You may use the variables mentioned above in different ways, or neglect them
    in some circumstances. Some widgets may not need a title, for example. Some
    widgets will use the $before_widget and $after_widget several times, or as
    arguments to tell another template tag how to format its output.
    
    * Optionally, use this syntax to add a configuration page to the admin:
    register_widget_control($name, $callback [, $width [, $height ] ]);
    Your callback will be used within the main form, so you don't have to worry
    about <form> tags or a button to submit the form.
    
    * Namespace your form elements so they don’t conflict with other widgets.
    
    * Each widget must have a unique name. You can replace an already-registered
    widget by registering another one with the same name, supplying your own
    callback.
    
    * Any extra arguments to register_sidebar_widget() or register_widget_control()
    will be passed to your callback. See the Text and RSS widgets for examples.
    
    * Any widget or control can be “unregistered” by passing an empty string to the
    registration function.
    
    * There are some undocumented functions. You are encouraged to read the source
    code and see how we’ve created the standard widgets using these functions.
    
    * Please test your widgets with several themes other than Classic and Default
    (they both use the ul/li/h2 markup).
    
    * Please audit the security of your widgets before distributing them.
    
    * If you would like your widget to be considered for use on WordPress.com, send
    a link (no attachments please) to widgets@wordpress.com and we’ll have a look.

    C’est surtout ce passage là qui me pose soucis et que j’arrive pas à appliquer ou exploiter :

    HOW DO I FIX UP MY THEME?

    First you have to ask yourself, “Do I know anything about my theme? Does it use
    an unordered list to create the sidebar?” (If you can’t answer that, you’ll
    need in-depth help on this task and that means either paying somebody a lot of
    money. Better yet, you can learn HTML. Sorry, we don’t teach that here.)

    Here is an example of good sidebar markup:

    Notice that the entire sidebar is an unordered list and the titles are in

    tags. Not every theme is built this way and it’s not necessary to do so, but
    it’s the simplest, most common, most semantically correct and the most widget-
    friendly sidebar markup there is. The element with id=”links” is the equivalent
    of one basic widget.

    When activated, the Dynamic Sidebar plugin gives you a few functions to use in
    your template just like template tags. These functions let WordPress replace
    your theme’s sidebar with a dynamic one while still falling back on the old
    sidebar in case you deactivate the plugin or remove all the widgets.

    Here is an example of a basic sidebar upgrade using the same markup as above:

    See? We just added two lines to the template and now it’ll display a dynamic
    sidebar if possible, otherwise display the old sidebar. Disabling the plugin
    or removing all the widgets from the sidebar in the admin interface will cause
    the old sidebar to be displayed.

    Now there is one more thing to be done to the theme. Assuming you are using
    WordPress 2.0 or higher, this change will be made within functions.php in your
    theme’s directory. (WordPress 1.5 users: we don’t encourage people to use
    WordPress 1.5 anymore, so you won’t find any help here. We don’t even know if
    it’s possible because it hasn’t been tested.)

    Here is an example of functions.php for a theme that does not yet have such a
    file (no blank lines at the beginning or end of the file, please):
    if ( function_exists(‘register_sidebar’) )
    register_sidebar();
    ?>

    That’s it, just four lines. This code tells the plugin that your theme will need
    exactly one dynamic sidebar. At this point, your admin interface should have an
    extra item in the Presentation menu: Sidebar Widgets. Try dragging some widgets
    from the palette on the left into the box marked Sidebar 1 and saving your
    changes. Got it working? Fantastic.

    Est-ce quelqu’un pourrait éclairer ma lanterne et me dire où coller cette fichue ligne de code pour que mon thème accepte les widget dans le sidebar ? Ou a défaut me signaler un plugin qui soit plus adapté à mon thème ? 😇

    #584182
    arthur
    Participant
    Initié WordPress
    24 contributions

    Ben j’ai le thème Freshy, j’ai installé le plugin Sidebar Widget sans aucun problème et sans aucune modif de rien du tout, ça fonctionne comme un charme.
    Quel est ton message d’erreur?

    #584183
    Catioucha
    Participant
    Padawan WordPress
    56 contributions

    Le problème c’est que ça marche, mais ça me surpime toute l’organisation en sous catégories à l’affichage… On dirait qu’il n’en tient pas compte du tout et je me retrouve avec toutes mes catégories à la suite sans décrochement et sans hierarchisation :( Alors que j’ai justement prit wordpress parce qu’il gérait les catégories et sous cat. nativement… et choisit le thème freshy parce qu’il marquait la hiérarchie à l’affichage de façon assez lisible…

    Je viens d’installer sidebar module là, en effet ça marche, mais on voit bien que les catégories sont toutes au même niveau… De plus, il n’y a plus l’accès aux fils rss de chaque catégorie… :( C’est dommage, ça dénature le thème je trouve…

    J’ai fait des screens pour illustrer le soucis :
    Sans Sidebar Widget on voit que le thème gère les sous catégories sans soucis.
    [img]http://catioucha.free.fr/Banque%20Images/sans_sidebar_widget.bmp[/img]

    Avec SW, les catégories sont de nouveau toutes à la file sans hiérarchisation. Sans compte le haut de sidebar (que j’ai pas screené) qui est pas des masses finalisé, avec des cadres de titre vides (calendrieret recherche notamment, voir sur le site comment ça rend, je le laisse installé pour l’isntant. Tiens, je viens de voir que les liens étaient en douiblon aussi ! On les trouve une première fois tout moches avec chaque catégorie de liens considéré comme un seul bloc avec gros titre encadré et tout, puis encore une fois en bas de sidebar selon la présentation précédente, plus lisible, sous l’unique titre encadré de “liens”…
    [img]http://catioucha.free.fr/Banque%20Images/avec_sidebar_widget.bmp[/img]
    Sans compter qu’une fois les widget sélectionnés, je trouve pas le moyen de revenir en arrière pour en supprimer un : par exemple on voit bien que les liens sont en doublon, en bas de sidebar sur le blog on voit que les anciens liens (ceux hiérarchisés) sont à nouveau affichés, or j’arrive pas à virer la première occurrence des liens…

    Petite question aussi : comment ça se fait que ce plugin ait installé d’autres plugins qui ont l’air de faire la même chose ? Je veux dire que dans ma fenêtre de gestion des plugins j’ai outre Sidebar Widgets j’ai aussi un truc qui s’appelle Sidebar Modules… Les deux sont différents ou ils font la même chose ? Il faut les utiliser soit l’un soit l’autre ? Ou les deux ?

    #584184
    arthur
    Participant
    Initié WordPress
    24 contributions

    Pour résumer ton problème, l’installation du plugin Sidebar Widget a transformé tes catégories, qui n’affichent plus désormais les sous-catégories et le rss feed. Est-ce bien ça? ^^

    Alors deux petites questions :

    – as-tu essayé de changer ton template (par celui par défaut par ex) pour voir si c’était propre à la skin Freshy ou pas? (malheureusement je peux pas faire le test moi même, je n’ai plus d’installation locale sous la main).
    A partir du moment où tu rencontres un bug/problème, le plus gros du travail est de le localiser (d’où ça vient préçisement), dès que t’as ça, la solution vient souvent toute seule. ^^

    – maintenant que tu as le Sidebar Widgets (qui est, à mon sens, la chose la plus géniale sur WP), as-tu regardé parmis les centaines de widgets qui existent, s’il n’y en a pas un qui gère les catégories comme tu le voudrais?
    Quelques liens de widgets :
    WordPress Widgets Blog (widgets pour catégories)
    Category Replacement Widget
    Plugin Database (déjà filtré sur catégories, tu y trouveras également des widgets).

    Perso, quand j’ai installé Sidebar Widgets sous Freshy, j’avais encore les sous-catégories et pas de bug particulier. Mais comme c’était pas l’agencement que je voulais, j’ai installé le plugin Sub pages.

    Pour ta 2ème question, Sidebar Modules me semble être la traduction française de Sidebar Widgets. Est-ce vraiment deux plugins différents dans ton ACP?

    J’utilise WP en anglais, après avoir installé Sidebar Widgets, rien d’autre n’est apparu (il ne s’est pas dédoublé ou quoi). Regarde peut-être si t’as pas installé deux fois le même plugin (en vérifiant si les fichiers sont les mêmes à l’intérieur dudit plugin).

    #584185
    Catioucha
    Participant
    Padawan WordPress
    56 contributions

    Je te remercie pour ce message très détaillé :D Je vais creuser la question en suivant les pistes que tu m’as indiquées et dès que j’ai des précisions ou des éléments neufs, je reposterai 🙂 Merci beaucoup pour tes explications claires !

    #584186
    Catioucha
    Participant
    Padawan WordPress
    56 contributions

    Alors, finalement iul semblerait que Sidebar Modules soit plus facile à utiliser que l’autre (Sidebar Widgets,), et en particulier il permet de taper soit même le titre de la rubrique (widget) qu’on va mettre en ligne : ce qui permet en effet de pouvoir avoir des titres de modules en parfait français sans trop galérer. Il est facile d’usage et l’organisation des catégories est simple.

    J’ai ensuite testé avec d’autres thèmes disponibles, en particulier le thème Blix : lui il continue de marquer la hierarchie entre les catégories, par contre il les suprime automatiquement pour les liens :p

    Voir là un screen se l’index avec le thème bliz

    #584187
    Catioucha
    Participant
    Padawan WordPress
    56 contributions

    Suite à un mail d’un wordpressien ayant rencontré le même problème que moi, je rends compte que je n’ai rien posté ici pour donner la solution de mon bidouillage… Honte sur moi. :fouet:

    Voici donc la solution que j’ai trouvé pour avoir bien propre la hiérarchisation des catégories sur le thème freshy avec des widgets adaptés :

    J’ai tout simplement opté pour un autre un autre “widget” de catégories qui, cette fois, laisse visible la hiérarchie des catégories et sous catégories ! Il s’agit du Category replacement widget qui s’installe en complément du Sidebar Module que j’avais mis et qui remplace le module “catégorie” disponible par défaut avec ce plugin (lequel me balançait les catégories à la suite sans hiérarchie).

    Comme ça l’affaire est classée ! 😋

7 sujets de 1 à 7 (sur un total de 7)
  • Vous devez être connecté pour répondre à ce sujet.